Naviate have commands that can help you design a retaining wall after a manufacturer's standard sizes. There are some steps to get to the final result, summarised it will look something like this;

  1. Insert and modify the retaining wall subassembly
  2. Use Naviate command Stepped Profile to create a top and bottom profile for the retaining wall. With this command you can adjust the lengths and the heights of the retaining wall elements to match the retailer's standard sizes
  3. In your Corridor Properties, set the targets for the top and bottom of the retaining wall and rebuild the corridor
  4. Fix potential rendering troubles in Civil 3D. If you don’t have any, lucky you! Otherwise follow the steps in this blog post

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When you are finished with your design you can export the retaining wall elements to solids. That process will be covered in an upcoming blog post.

Let´s go through the steps!

1. Retaining Wall Subassembly

To import a retaining wall subassembly, go to the Naviate-tab in the Ribbon and in the Corridor-Panel find Insert Subassembly.

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You’ll find the retaining wall subassemblies in the standard folder, ready for use both against lanes or against ground, as well as on the left or right side.

Select one of the retaining walls and you will see a description field at the bottom of the dialogue, displaying information about the retaining wall, such as available dimensions from the retailer.

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When the Retaining Wall is inserted to the drawing, you can view and change the parameters in Properties or Subassembly Properties as per usual.

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As written in the description in the Import Subassembly dialogue, the thickness of the foot, the foot length and the thickness of the wall will vary according to the wall height.

An example of what that means

(If you like to dig in to how the subassembly works, keep reading. If you just want to get the top and bottom height of the retaining wall correct, please go to step 2.)

The Wall height in this example is 2,0 m (see the underlined text in red below).

The Wall Thickness depends on the height. The numbers in the red rectangle means that if the wall is 1,75 m high - the wall thickness is 0,18 m. The format is wall height comma sign thickness of the wall for that height. The vertical line separates the heights. If the wall is 2.5 m height, the thickness is still 0,18 m. Between the heights, the thickness is interpolated. Therefore, the thickness is 0,18 meters for a 2,0 m wall height.

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Moving on to the Foot Inner Width that works the same, the green rectangle. For a 2,0 m wall height, the inner width is 1,0 m.

Foot Inner/Outer Thickness is 0,14 m for a 2,0 m wall height, as seen in the blue triangle.

Try to change the height and see what happens with the foot and thickness of the wall.

2. Stepped profile

To set the height for the retaining wall top or/and bottom, use the Naviate command Stepped Profile.

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The drawing in the following example contains an alignment, profile and a corridor made with an assembly including a retaining wall subassembly.

Side note: Civil 3D has a problem rendering the 3D view in the third quadrant. How this is solved is shown in Step 4.

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To get the retaining wall to represent the length and height of the different retaining wall elements the retailer offers, run the command Stepped Profile.

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Alignment: Start with selecting the alignment the profile is connected to.

Add PVIs to Profile: Select an already existing profile or klick New to create a new one. In this example we will only do a stepped profile for the top of the retaining wall (to make a bottom profile, simply make another profile named e.g. RW Bottom and the following steps will be alike).

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Klick OK and the profile, in this case the retaining wall top is added to the existing profile view.

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Back to the Stepped Profile dialogue. To set the retaining wall element (length and heights) for the first part, select start and end station. Start station will be 0 and End station in this case will be the corner. Why is that? Well, the corner elements from the retailer often comes in a piece of 1 m on each side of the corner. Hence why you should in that case check the Last PVI at Distance from End. The rest of elements, the “normal” elements, comes in two meters elements or longer (in this example 5-meter elements are used).

Fill in the rest of the dialogue, and when you are done with the settings from the start to the corner, klick Add PVIs and the first part of the profile is stepped in the profile view.

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Next step will be the rest of the alignment, from start station 14 to the end station. From the corner, station 14, we want that one-meter element again, so make sure to check the First PVI at distance from Start.

The settings under Reference Profiles will remain. Klick Add PVIs and the rest of the profile is now stepped.

To zoom click the Zoom button and zoom in to the profile where the height for the elements against the corner may differ.

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To get the heights to match in the corner, use the Raise/Lower button right against the Add PVIs button.

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When finished with the stepped profile, RW Top profile, the last step for the command is to click the Add to Corridor button. A new dialogue pops up where you will select the settings for the corridor stations. To get the corridor to be built with the correct stations for the stepped profile, fill in the dialogue for the retaining wall top and/or bottom as Profile 1 and 2. Also select the start and end station for the retaining wall and the rest of the settings and klick OK.

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3. Target the retaining wall

In the Corridor Properties, set the target for the Top Profile to RW Top for the Retaining Wall subassembly (and/ or bottom of course).

Rebuild the corridor. As the stations for the stepped profile for the retaining wall are added to the corridor, you will now see the different retaining wall elements in the 3D-view.

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It still looks like there is a gap in the corner, but it is only Civil 3D having trouble rendering the 3D view.

4. Extra tip: Fix the rendering trouble

The rendering problem could be solved via inserting a small radius in the corner. Preferably with the Insert Curve in Alignment command.

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Insert a small curve in the corner and rebuild the corridor. The 3D view now looks good.

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Note that the stations in the alignment also changes as the curve is inserted. Depending on what's important in your situation, the stepped profile command should be run again on the updated alignment to get it all correct (or of course the curve could be inserted before the stepped profile command was run). Instead of picking the corner as the End Station, pick the first point on the curve. When defining the elevations from the corner to the finish, pick Start Station as the end of the curve.

Want to know more?